The writing on the wall #7 – location, location, location

18 12 2014

Location, location, location...

Let’s for a moment put aside the discussion as to whether an investment by a law firm into premium real estate makes sense. Let’s assume that clients don’t object to funding acres of marble and an atrium full of lush vegetation. This question is about where your firm’s offices are, not what they are.

The location question is very personal. For some firms it might be simply be about growth – we are outgrowing our current premises – do we just need a bigger office, or should we open a second office (and if so, where). For other firms it might be about national expansion, or response to an existing or future competitive threat. However for many firms the stakes are higher, and it’s about international expansion.

It may be an understatement, but international strategy is not easy. Aside from the economics, the cultural, regulatory and language differences, suddenly the complexity and management overhead increases dramatically. Whether the market entry strategy is through acquisition, merger  or lateral hire, you can then throw a whole host of political and personal factors into the mix.

With that in mind, opening a new office seems like a decision to be made thoughtfully, but in a fast moving market that is changing more than ever, how can you make the time you need to really assess where the right locations are for you?

 





The writing on the wall #5 management complexity

15 12 2014

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Firms are getting bigger. Mergers and International expansion may be the main culprits in recent years, bit add the economy slowly returns to growth, plenty of other law firms face the challenges associated with getting bigger.
Some, like the competition for talent are frequently mentioned, but there is another that is less talked about and yet arguably harder nut to crack. It’s the management overhead. Aside from the difficulty and effectiveness of management, how can firms manage the spiralling cost and resource drain?

Whether it’s professional management cost or the time of the most competent partners, it’s easy for it to grow unchecked. What’s the story in your firm?





How hard is your work, really?

1 04 2010

Outside the profession, despite the bad press that lawyers get, the majority of people still think of the practice of law as an intellectually challenging job. Fundamentally, I think they are right. It takes time to learn the black letter law that underpins the work, and more time still to understand how to apply it to the wide variety of circumstances that a lawyer will come across in day to day practice. To then present that advice in a format appropriate to the client, to use creativity to solve problems, and to build the relationships and trust necessary to build a long career is tough.

A brain surgeon: is he smarter than you?

But (you were expecting a “but”, right?), within this work profile there is of course a spectrum of complexity. Traditionally, as lawyers became more experienced, they took on more complex work and more junior lawyers stepped onto the first rung of the ladder to begin their career learning to do the less complex work. But somewhere in the middle, things get a little hazy. In the old favourite “Managing the Professional Service Firm”, Maister talked about the classic challenge of under-delegation, and my suggestion for today is to revisit this in your working lives.

When times get tough, as they have certainly been recently, the classic law firm model of having chargeable hours as the main metric for judging performance encourages lawyers to hoard work to keep their figures healthy. Whether that work is done at the right level (or indeed even profitable) is often a question that is not asked.  As firms are restructured to realign the cost base with the reduced revenues that come with a recession, mid and lower level resource is stripped out. This recession was arguably different from the previous two in that more partners found themselves on the move, but irrespective of this, my point is that as the work volume starts to increase, many firms will find they don’t have the right profile of  resources to do the work efficiently.

Have a look at how you are spending your day. Not in a “timesheet-track-every-six-minutes” kind of way, but in a more substantive “where am I spending my time, and who else could do this work” kind of way. Could work be passed down to junior colleagues? Could it be a valuable training exercise? What about automation or outsourcing? If your time was freed-up, how else could you create value for the firm or legal department?

Enjoy your day today, and particularly appreciate the difficult parts that challenge and stretch you!





And in the beginning……

5 11 2009
Intelligent Challenge

Comfortable with uncertainty

Prompted by thinking about how social media can merge personal and business worlds, and the pros and cons of keeping them separate, I started thinking about blogging more seriously. Stimulated further by my failure to get a website up and running quickly enough, and then finally spurred into action by some reflection on the need to execute rather than plan, I have taken the plunge.

To some degree, the blog is also an adventure, a journey into the unknown, which is another theme I’ve been reflecting on lots at the moment; particularly after reading Bob Johansen’s excellent book “Leaders Make the Future”, where he talks about the VUCA world; volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity.

One of my key learnings over the last 18 months or so, has been to be more comfortable with uncertainty, and to move away from my inherent comfort zone of structure and planning. Anyone interested in this should also read Transitions by William Bridges; a classic on how people respond to change.

So, what to expect; well, Intelligent Challenge is a business aimed at helping lawyers and law firms be more effective, but I also expect this to evolve as I grow and new projects emerge. One such project I’m thinking about is a book; the concept is 80% formed, so watch this space.

I expect the blog to be much wider than just my business, but to stop short of my personal rants and the like, all of which will stay safely in the walled garden of facebook.

Finally, I’m a big believer in networks and communities, so if you are reading this, please do comment. I’m feedback agile too, and love to learn, so constructive criticism also welcome. Enjoy.